The Case For Investing In Life Science

Ian Cassel Blog, Educational Leave a Comment

Last week Jonathan Norris, Managing Director at Silicon Valley Bank, wrote two very interesting articles on investing in life science companies.  I’ve invested in the life science space with mediocre results, but I don’t know if that is because of my limited sample size or if I’m just not good at it 🙂 Even though both articles mostly talk about private equity, I think there are many takeaways for the public market place.  

First Mover Advantage: The Case For Investing in Life Science

Questions surround the life science industry’s ability to provide substantial venture returns, the decline in fundraising, the difficulty of navigating the regulatory environment and establishing reimbursement. However, if we examine the underlying life science data and recent M&A activity, a different, decidedly positive perspective emerges.

Continued Rebound: Trends in Life Science M&A

Questions surround the life science industry’s ability to provide substantial venture returns, the decline in fundraising, the difficulty of navigating the regulatory environment and establishing reimbursement. However, if we examine the underlying life science data and recent M&A activity, a different, decidedly positive perspective emerges.

 

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About the Author

Ian Cassel

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Ian is a full-time microcap investor. He is the founder of MicroCapClub, CIO of Intelligent Fanatics Capital Management, and co-founder of IntelligentFanatics.com. Ian started investing as a teenager and learned from losing his money over and over again. Microcap companies are the smallest public companies that exist, representing 48% of all public companies in North America. Berkshire Hathaway, Wal-Mart, Amgen, Netflix, and many others started as small microcap companies. Ian’s belief is the key to outsized returns is finding great companies early because all great companies started as small companies.

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